THE HOLY DOOR

The sign of the Holy Door, so outstanding a sign of the Jubilee, evokes the passage from sin to grace which every Christian is called to accomplish. More…

VIRTUAL JUBILEE 2016

Editorial

Certificate of Participation

People from all around the world can also participate to the Jubilee 2016 virtually and they will be given a Virtual Participation Certificate. We understand that some pilgrims will be unable to make the trip to Rome to participate to the Jubilee, for this reason The-Jubilee2016.com has therefore instituted a Virtual Participation Certificate to allow people from all around the world similar opportunities as regular pilgrims. More…

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SPIRITUAL LEGACIES

POPE JOHN PAUL II

Saint John Paul the Great

 

John Paul II, in Latin Ioannes Paulus II, in Italian Giovanni Paolo II, born Karol Józef Wojtyla (18 May 1920 ‒ 2 April 2005) was a Roman Catholic priest, bishop, and Cardinal who eventually rose to become Pope. He was elected by the second Papal conclave of 1978, which was called after Pope John Paul I, who, elected in August after the death of Pope Paul VI, died after thirty-three days. Then-Cardinal Wojtyla was elected on the third day of the conclave and adopted his predecessor's name out of tribute to the deceased former pontiff.


In the years since his death, John Paul II has been made a Saint by the Church. He is referred to as Pope Saint John Paul II or Saint John Paul the Great. He was the second longest-serving pope in modern history after Pope Pius IX, who served for nearly 32 years from 1846 to 1878. Born in Poland, John Paul II was the first non-Italian pope since the Dutch Pope Adrian VI, who served from 1522 to 1523.


John Paul II significantly improved the Catholic Church's relations with Judaism, Islam, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Anglican Communion. He upheld the Church's teachings on such matters as artificial contraception and the ordination of women, but also supported the Church's Second Vatican Council and its reforms.


He was one of the most travelled world leaders in history, visiting 129 countries during his pontificate. As part of his special emphasis on the universal call to holiness, he beatified 1,340 people and canonised 483 saints, more than the combined tally of his predecessors during the preceding five centuries.


By the time of his death, he had named most of the College of Cardinals, consecrated or co-consecrated a large number of the world's bishops, and ordained many priests. A key goal of his papacy was to transform and reposition the Catholic Church. His wish was "to place his Church at the heart of a new religious alliance that would bring together Jews, Muslims and Christians in a great religious armada." However, his main aim, as he used to underline, was to spread the message of Divine Mercy, revealed by Jesus Christ to Saint Faustina Kowalska, and thus to prepare the world for His final coming.


John Paul II's cause for canonisation commenced in 2005 one month after his death with the traditional five-year waiting period waived. On 19th December 2009, John Paul II was proclaimed Venerable by his successor Pope Benedict XVI and was beatified on 1st May 2011 (Divine Mercy Sunday) after the Congregation for the Causes of Saints attributed one miracle to him, the healing of a French nun from Parkinson's disease.


A second miracle attributed to John Paul II was approved on 2nd July 2013, and confirmed by Pope Francis two days later (two miracles must be attributed to a person to be declared a saint). John Paul II was canonised on 27th April 2014 (again Divine Mercy Sunday), together with Pope John XXIII.


On 11th September 2014, Pope Francis added John Paul II's optional memorial feast day to the worldwide General Roman Calendar of Saints, in response to worldwide requests. It is traditional to celebrate Saints' feast days on the anniversary of their deaths, but that of John Paul II (22nd October) is celebrated on the anniversary of his papal inauguration.